Blogs

Plaza Voices: Stories of Integration

Photo from the "Stories of Integration" series on view at Barnum Library

Desiree S. of the Ross-Barnum branch writes:

Moving away from one’s home can be one of the most challenging life experiences. Having come to Denver via Oklahoma City myself just one year ago, I can certainly vouch for there being a period of readjustment -- one has to discover all new neighborhoods, meet all new friends and perhaps reconnect with old ones. In short, one must create an everyday existence that is different from what was there before. But what about adjusting to a place where both the language and the culture are completely foreign?

ideaLAB Now Open for Families!

We're happy to announce the launch of Family ideaLAB next month! Starting in October, every second Saturday of the month from 11am to 1pm will be all ages in the ideaLAB, our makerspace in Central. We'll be offering projects for families to work on together, but you're also welcome to drop in and just explore the lab and work on your own projects together.

Readers' Guide Retrospective: An Old-Fashioned Research Tool Gets a Modern-Day Search Interface

Are you (ahem!) old enough to remember the green set of Readers’ Guide to Periodical Literature in your library? For decades, the Guide was the gold standard access point to US and Canadian magazines.

If you wanted to read all the article coverage of the lunar landing, for example, the Readers’ Guide would provide you with a list of citations across magazine titles, saving you the time of combing through each individual publication.

The Library, Arts & Crafts, and a Fair You Won't Want to Miss!

Necklace

Years ago I was working at a job I didn't like, and spending my time away from the job thinking about how much I didn't like it. Maybe you can relate. Then one Saturday morning I was browsing through my neighborhood library, when I saw a book about whirligigs. My grandfather was a master carpenter and when I was little he made a whirligig for the roof of his garage. It was a boy on a bike being chased by a dog, and when the wind blew, the boy's feet moved the pedals, which moved the wheels on the bike!

Virtual Read-Out For Banned Books Week

Virtual Read-Out

Lewd? Obscene? Scandalous? Perhaps, but that may be part of the reason I have loved so many of the infamous books that show up year after year on the American Library Association’s Frequently Banned and Challenged Books lists. This year I get to share my love of these titles with the world as Banned Books Week, one of the more glorious weeks in books, is upon us and this year we want you to share your favorite.

How to Prepare a Living Will and Durable Medical Power of Attorney

Currently, only about 1 in 4 Americans has a Living Will, a legal document that details what medical decisions should be made if you become too sick or injured to speak for yourself.

Plaza Voices: Denver Startup Week

Cover of "Startup Weekend," available through DPL

Denver Startup Week is going on now! This multi-day event brings together some of the most innovative people in the state for information sessions, networking, and discussion about creative entrepreneurship in Colorado.

Play and Learn Kits at a Library Near You!

Did you know that there are many cheap or free things you can do at home to help your child get ready to read? For example, being able to recognize shapes is an important skill that helps children prepare to recognize letters. If you want to help your child practice this, you can cut many different shapes out of construction paper (or even junk mail or old magazines, if you don't have construction paper). Your child can assemble the different shapes into designs, or practice tracing them. You can talk about the shapes you see in books, or try to find shapes in the world around you.

Cook Books?

I love reading, and I love cooking so when something comes along and unites the two it's better than chocolate and peanut butter (or fresh homemade ricotta with a peach and mint salsa draped with prosciutto on crostini, just sayin'). These great items are literary feasts!

Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature's Most Memorable Meals by Dinah Fried

Tequila Mockingbird: Cocktails with a Literary Twist by Tim Federle

Literary Feasts: Inspired Eating from Classic Fiction by Sean Brand

What's For Dinner, Pavlov?

It seems like whenever food is mentioned in a book or a movie, I end up getting hungry for (or curious about) that food. When we read Catch 22 in high school, I was ravenous for eggs for weeks. After I finished giggling about some of the names of dishes in the Harry Potter books, I went looking for the foods.

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