Elaine's blog

I Have Health Insurance... Now What?

Image of insurance card - Courtesy of Blue Cross Blue Shield

Have you received your new health insurance card in the mail? Maybe a packet of additional information that leaves you with some questions? In Colorado, almost 135,000 of us enrolled in new health insurance through Connect For Health Colorado!

What Can You Learn from a Dog?

Guide dog in harness. Courtesy of Guide Dogs for the Blind

You recognize a guide dog when you see one, but I bet there are questions you wish you could ask. Meet Barbara Wells, an experienced puppy-raiser for Guide Dogs for the Blind, and the 5 month old puppy she is training. Specially bred, and very specially trained, GDB dogs make all the difference for their blind or visually-impaired partners.

We Will Ride!! We Will Ride!! We Will Ride!!

Courtesy of ADAPT.org

Meet some folks who have spent time behind bars.

Larry Ruiz (1954-2012) had cerebral palsy and spent the first 18 years of his life warehoused in institutions for the physically and mentally disabled, or in nursing homes. It turned out he had a sharp mind! He was among the first to roll in front of a bus in protest of inaccessible transportation, and was arrested over 60 times. He lived independently for over 30 years after leaving the Heritage House nursing home in 1975.

End of Open Enrollment

Courtesy of DailyDot.com

"In the past, people buying coverage directly from an insurer could generally sign up any time of the year as long as they got through the medical underwriting process that insurers used to evaluate applicants. Not anymore." (see this Denver Post article for more)

1)  As the end of March draws near, Connect For Health Colorado (CFHC) wants everyone to know that open enrollment is ending for health insurance throughout the state.

Book Something Healthy, Just For You!

Women full of life! Courtesy of National Women's Health Week

National Women's Health Week runs from May 12th - May 18th, but it doesn't stop there.  As the days, and weeks, and months of our busy lives go by, we face choices about health all the time.

Will we ride the bike, or drive the car?  Will we run back in and grab those sunglasses before heading out for the day?  How about the sunscreen?  Will it be a night out with friends, or a stop by the gym on the way home?  Will we squeeze in one more episode of NCIS reruns, or will we use that hour toward a good night's sleep?

Our Democracy Un-Spun! #10 Get out there and VOTE!

Courtesy www.american.edu/media/news/20100907_2010_Primaries_Voter_Turnout.cfm/

In the 1948 election, Thomas E. Dewey was projected to trounce President Harry S. Truman by a wide margin. Dewey was then the Governor of New York, and was considered stiff and pompous, "...the only man who could strut sitting down," some said. None the less, the polls were predicting a landslide in his favor.

The Chicago Tribune would be the first to report it in their early edition, with the famous headline, "Dewey Defeats Truman." Instead Truman won by more than two million popular and 114 electoral votes.

Our Democracy Un-Spun! #9 The Electoral College & The Polls

Courtesy www.american.edu/media/news/20100907_2010_Primaries_Voter_Turnout.cfm/

It's 6:45 p.m. You're tired from a long day at work, and have just finished throwing something together for a quick dinner when the phone rings. It could be a telemarketer? A scam?

Or it could be Gallup Polls. Meet Ed Dubas. He works at the Gallup call center in Omaha, Nebraska, making polling phone calls for various organizations. A former used car salesman, Ed has been their best interviewer in the world for five years. He loves what he does, despite the hang-ups and four letter words. For him working for Gallup is about 'documenting the will of the people.' Gallup is especially well known for the quality of their political polls.

Our Democracy Un-Spun! #8 – Statistical Hot Spots & The Debates

Courtesy www.american.edu/media/news/20100907_2010_Primaries_Voter_Turnout.cfm/

In 1776, some of the founding fathers borrowed money from France and the Netherlands to help fund the American Revolution. We owed $43 million by January 1, 1783. Congress voted to raise taxes, as well as to assume some public debt.

In 1790, with a debt estimated at $77.1 million, interest-bearing bonds were issued and the government established its good credit. Alexander Hamilton became our first Secretary of the Treasury. He helped design the strong centralized funding of the United States, including tariffs and taxes. The Louisiana Purchase cost $15 million, at just 4 cents per acre, but it derailed efforts to pay down the debt at that time.

Our Democracy Un-Spun! #7 – Statistics & How Can We Know the Truth?

Courtesy www.american.edu/media/news/20100907_2010_Primaries_Voter_Turnout.cfm/

"Even such fundamental mathematical verities as … ‘1 and 1 are 2,’ can be misapplied: one cup of...

water plus one cup of popcorn are not equal to two cups of soggy popcorn." John Allen Paulos, Innumeracy, p. 67.

Our Democracy Un-Spun! #6 - Money on the Colorado Scene

Courtesy www.american.edu/media/news/20100907_2010_Primaries_Voter_Turnout.cfm/

We're looking at important 2012 issues and races in Denver and in Colorado, too. In Denver, we will decide about funding for our public schools, and whether or not to reverse the limits on the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights from previous legislation.

Denver has a database for Campaign Finance Reports, and the Denver Clerk and Recorder's Office will be mailing out notices of the election soon, with summaries of the comments received for and against ballot issues.

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