Reviews and Blog Posts: royalty

The pigeon pie mystery

by Julia Stuart

Reviewer Rating:
3

This is a charming cozy mystery set in Victorian England among the "grace and favour" set.  While reading I learned many interesting facts about arsenic, and India, how to avoid bill collectors, and how to bicycle in the 1890s. Princess Mink and her maid Pooki are a wonderful comic duo,...

The red queen

by Philippa Gregory

Reviewer Rating:
3

I've given The Red Queen a middle grade, not necessarily because I liked the book, but more because it did its job.  It's not that it's a bad book, nor is it poorly written or historically inaccurate. It's just that the main character, Margaret Beaufort, is probably one of the most...

King Peggy

by Peggielene Bartels

Reviewer Rating:
4

King Peggy is an amazing true story.  Peggy was working as a secretary in Washington D.C. when out of the blue she got a phone call telling her that she is the new King of Otuam, her hometown in Ghana.  Her life changes dramatically.  Peggy isn’t just a secretary living...

Cinder

by Marissa Meyer

Reviewer Rating:
4

Cinder is cyborg who is a skilled mechanic in New Beijing. She lives with her cruel stepmother and step sisters. This book loosely follows a Cinderella story. Of course there is a prince who by chance happens to become quite friendly with Cinder not knowing she is a cyborg. New...

The Royal Treatment

Royal Film

It pays to play the king (or queen, as the case may be.) Whether it's comedy or drama, on television or the big screen, we love a good portrayal of the British royal family. And a small number of talented actors and actresses have been rewarded for just that--delivering award-winning performances as British monarchs.

I've been a Colin Firth fan since I first saw him in Shakespeare in Love as the snobby and sniveling Lord Wessex, and I've been an Anglophile for as long as I can remember, so there was no way I was going to miss him play the stammering King George VI in The King's Speech. I saw it this past weekend, and it actually rendered me speechless--a rare moment. Firth is magnificent in this clever film, which is about much more than George's speaking difficulties.

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