Reviews and Blog Posts: Technology

Ask the Gadget Guy!

Have a new or old tech toy and wish you had someone to help you figure it out? Want to know more about Android apps? Trying to make the most of your iPad? Dying to know what a Nook is? It's time to Ask the Gadget Guy!

On Saturday, August 27, the Community Technology Center's Gadget Guy will be available to answer all of your gadget questions. Don't have a gadget yet to bring with you? Not to worry. Devices like the iPad, Motorola Xoom, Nook and more will be available for you to try out.

Ask The Gadget Guy
Saturday, August 27, 2-4 p.m.
Central Library, Level 4
Community Technology Center
Free and open to the public

Presenting with panache!

PowerPoint logo

Everyone likes to be a show-off once in a while!  You can learn to make fabulous visual presentations that will knock the socks off your classmates or colleagues using PowerPoint or Prezi!

Students are often asked to present research or report to classmates on subjects for school.  Business professionals sometimes find themselves speaking in front of clients or colleagues.  Don't get caught off guard the next time you're asked to speak.  We can show you how to create a visual component to accompany your oh-so-eloquent voice!

Blog! Blog! Blog! Learn how to Blog!

blog

What is a “blog” anyway?  For starters, you’re reading one right now.  Denverlibrary.org has several blogs, and they seem to be popping up all over the internet; they have been for years.  But what are they?

“Blog” is short for “web blog.”  Typically a blog will have some sort of theme, whether it’s an organization’s blog like this one, a blog about a specific topic (say, cats saying absurd things, or things to do in Denver when you're broke) or a personal  diary (not too personal though because it’s being shared with the public).  Some blogs are text-based while others tend to post videos and images.&n

Practice your tech skills at home!

gcflearnfree.org

Maybe you're the son or daughter of a parent who has just begun attending classes at the Community Technology Center. Or perhaps you have recently decided you'd like to create Excel spreadsheets or Tweet about your business. Whether you'd like to practice what you learned in class or you are hoping to master something new, there are free online lessons and tutorials that can help you improve your skills!

Goodwill Community Foundation has an outstanding website, www.gcflearnfree.org, that has self-paced instruction and videos on everything from creating a brochure in Microsoft Publisher to adjusting your privacy settings on Facebook. You can also create an account and register for free online classes, which earn you accredited Continuing Education Units and a Certificate of Completion! Over two million people have expanded their repertoires wtih GCFLearnFree.org. Give it a try!

Design and Circumstance

Small Things Considerd:  Why There is No Perfect Design

Henry Petroski is an extraordinary engineer who has been called the "poet laureate of technology." He explores the histories of everyday things and exposes them as engineering marvels.

Favorite titles include:

Improve Your Body, Mind, and Closet!

Whether you want to feed your body and spirit by starting a yoga practice, improve the look of your closet, or need some tax tips, Fresh City Life My Branch has something for you this week.

Start off by getting up to speed on the Denver Public Library's new catalog, Polaris on Wednesday, March 16 at 6:00 at the Ross-Cherry Creek Branch. Find out about keeping track of your reading history, placing holds, and other fabulous features!

Sewing, Traveling, and the DPL Catalog, Oh My!

Fresh City Life My Branch has a lot of choices for you this week, from learning about Polaris, DPL's new catalog, to women's history to the basics of sewing.

Want to get back into the groove of placing holds and checking your library account online? Learn about all the new features of Polaris, the Denver Public Library's new system at one of these classes:

Monday, March 7 at 6:00 p.m. at the Ross-Broadway Branch Library

Community Technology Center keeps growing

Over the last few months, public computers at the Central Library have been moving to the CTC, a centralized location on the fourth floor where we have technology experts ready to provide training and support. If you've visited us recently, you've probably noticed we've gotten a bit busier on the fourth floor. In fact, the number of people using computers in the CTC has more than tripled in the last year. In December alone, we had over 12,000 uses of the computers on the fourth floor.

These numbers will continue to climb, as we moved the final 22 public computers to the CTC in early January, bringing us up to 94 total. Later this year we will be adding even more computers, and filling out our two computer training classrooms, thanks to participation in the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program. Each step brings the CTC closer to the vision of a full Community Technology Center. If you haven't already, stop by and check us out.

Day of Inventions

Day of Inventions

August 12 is a day of inventions. On this day in history, Isaac Singer is granted a patent for his sewing machine; Henry Ford's Model T rolls off the assembly line; and the IBM personal computer is released.

In addition to books about these and other inventions, modern inventors will find PubWEST imminently useful.

My favorite invention, other than running water and the printing press, is duct tape. If I could invent one thing it would be a combined washing machine and dryer or a car that ran on garbage like in Back to the Future 2.

The Library in Your Pocket: Speak-Up

Blog image

Are you reading this blog post from a wireless laptop or cell phone? Chances are good that you are. According to a new report from the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project, 6 in 10 American adults over 18 regularly use the internet from a wireless device.

And more cell phone owners are using a greater variety of cell phone functionality compared with usage in 2009. Additionally, the study reflects that minority Americans are more likely to access the web via a mobile device.

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