Movies Blog

Goodbye Egon

Dr. Egon Spengler

You may not recognize his face or even his name, but the comedy world lost an incredible talent today with the passing of Harold Ramis. He leaves an astounding legacy of writing and directing some of the most enduring (and quotable) comedy features and acting, most famously as the ever serious Ghostbuster, Dr. Egon Spengler.

Ghostbusters remains one my all time favorite films. Its witty dialog, spot-on acting, eccentric characters, creative storytelling, and pseudoscientific plot lines makes it one of the most enjoyable and audience friendly films I can think of. Pure desert island worthy material. If this was all Ramis left the film world, it would be enough in my book. But his body of work includes so much more and in light of his passing feels like it all deserves another view. Here are some of the highlights:

4 Evil Villains that need no introduction!

Death, destruction, pain, heartache, absolute fear, and no remorse!!!

 

 

These four men are undoubtedly the definition of pure evil and these are the reasons why. 

 

 

 

6 Movies That Will Make You Cry

These 6 movies will touch your heart in the saddest of ways!

A movie that makes you cry or really sad is a very special film. Think about it. Making a sad movie is no small feat by any means! The director has to meticulously plan and, most importantly, strike a nerve with the movie's audience. Although a movie might make you break out the tissues, hug a pillow, or just plain cry, think about how it is that you can so viscerally connect to the film, its story, and its characters. If this has ever happened to you, don't worry! You're not alone; I'm pretty sure millions of other people cried just like you did.

Win your Oscar Party with DPL and DFS

The Age of Movies: Selected Writings of Pauline Kael

Beginning on Wednesday, February 5th, The Denver Film Society will launch a new film education course, Film Criticism: The Envelope Puhleeze - What Award Season Fever Tells Us About The "Best" Of Hollywood, taught by esteemed Denver Post film and theater critic, Lisa Kennedy.  

The class -- which meets every Wednesday night from 6:30-9:00 at the Sie FilmCenter -- will examine the peculiar cultural ritual that is the film Awards Season and consider what it means to single out one movie as the "Best Picture" of the year.

Whether you're an Oscar fanatic or Oscarphobic, Kennedy's class will definitely give you something to think about in-between munching on popcorn and snickering at fashion faux pas.

Generations of Animation

Is it safe to say that we're in the midst of the golden age of animation?

I would say yes! We've been in the Golden age since the '90s. Why you ask? Since the release of Beauty and the Beast VOL. 2 in 1991 until now, there have been more animated movies grossing over one hundred million dollars than any point in history! The top 50 grossing animated movies of all time happened in the last 20 years and the numbers prove it

Life... is a lot easier if you smile

Through the good and the bad, if you smile more often, life will seem easier. 

Watch a movie that makes you giggle, smile, and cheers you up.  One that puts you in that mood where you forget about your problems and the hustle and bustle of everyday life. There seem to be no worries in the world when you have a great comedy to take you to another place. So, smile a little more and life will feel a lot better.

Ladies and Gentlemen, let me introduce to you- Jan Švankmajer!

His name is Jan Švankmajer and he is probably hands down the most creative, disturbing, artistic movie director who has ever lived!

My statement above is no joke; I swear, even the master of darkness (Stephen King) cannot compete with Jan Švankmajer. Seriously-- take a look at one of his films! I swear, they appear to be from another planet.  Even though it might seem that Jan Švankmajer is seriously loony!!! I must say he is a creative genius!!!!

Classic '70s films

The '70s

Let's re-visit the '70s and remind ourselves what a groovy time it was for movie goers.

Awwww what a time; disco balls, bell bottom jeans, muscle cars, and so much more! But, let's not forget that this was also a time for movies that were just plain awesome. They say that the golden age of movies was between 1927 and 1963, but I feel that is premature. If you really look at the number of films that left a profound impact with film audiences in the '70s, you would agree that 1963 date should be extended to 1979. If you're interested, you can also check out the links below to learn interesting facts about these films.

These May Be The Strangest Movies Ever!

GOZU

It's October, and as you know, it is a time for scares, costumes, and all things creepy. I've decided to dedicate this blog to this, my favorite time of the year, but with a little twist. Instead of the classic scary movie blog, this blog will be about the strangest movies I've ever seen.

I have seen a ton of bizarre, strange, and unusual films in my lifetime, but I think I've finally found two films that really "take the cake." The Films are Gozu and Little Otik. When I ordered these movies and saw the images on the DVD cases for the first time, I was already preparing myself for a trippy experience. For example, take a look at the covers of these two films; one has a man crouched down in his underwear with a giant bull head for a mask, and the other has a lady holding a wooden baby doll-type thing that has clothes and a pacifier.

Take-Home Cinematheque: The French New Wave

Jean Seberg kisses Jean-Paul Belmondo in Breathless (1960).

Like the Cinémathèque Française, where young French filmmakers like, Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut received their early cinematic education, the Denver Public Library preserves and makes available a large collection of films from a variety of eras and cultures, as well a number of books and articles on film history and criticism.  Channel the spirit of the nouvelle vague and let DPL turn your living room into a screening room. Vive la France!

Motivated by an intense love of all things cinematic, the core group of directors associated with the New Wave -- Godard, Truffaut, Claude Chabrol, Jacques Rivette and Eric Rohmer -- transformed themselves from film lovers to film critics, and from film critics to film directors.

Syndicate content