Research News

Craft Beer: Good for What Ales You

A year ago, the Research Blog reported that, according to the Colorado Brewers Guild, our state had 139 licensed breweries and ranked third in number of breweries per capita.  The industry is still hopping;  we now boast 188 breweries and a ranking of number 2 in number per capita.

Jonathan Shikes, Westword's "Beer Man," explains, "As for why Colorado is so beery, my theory (which has absolutely no grounding in research) is the presence of the Coors plant in Golden, the single largest brewing facility in the world. Boulder and Longmont became high-tech centers because of IBM being there and attracting many tech-minded people to the state. Coors may have done the same for beer, attracting people who are focused on beer or focused on making beer better."

Sasquash: When Gourds Attack

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it"               

     --George Santayana, squash grower and part-time philosopher

         

I knew there would be consequences, but I went ahead and planted seven squash seeds in my backyard. Then, a perfect storm of hot weather and monsoon rains resulted in plants as fast-growing and unruly as a teenage boy. So read on, friends, family and colleagues, since there may be a squash or two in your future.

Looking for Money to Finance your Project? Check Out Foundation Grants to Individuals Online

Do you want to attend the ukulele festival, but lack funds?  Although foundations don't generally offer grant money to individuals, the Foundation Center can help you find those that do. 

Funding opportunities for students, professionals, researchers and artistic types are available through the FC's Foundation Grants to Individuals Online, a database of nearly 10,000 foundation and public charity programs including:

Don't Make a Major Mistake: How to Choose a College Degree

I was in college in the late 1970s, when dinosaurs roamed the earth and selecting a major was relatively simple - there were no exotic degrees available such as Casino Management, Biosystems Engineering, Culinary Science or Digital Arts.

The stakes weren't as high, either. The average cost of tuition alone in 1980 for a 4-year public institution was about $10,000 total, compared to today's price tag of $64,000. That, coupled with the challenge of finding a job, any job, in our current economy can make choosing a degree that is marketable yet intellectually stimulating a challenge.

Book Something Healthy, Just For You!

Women full of life! Courtesy of National Women's Health Week

National Women's Health Week runs from May 12th - May 18th, but it doesn't stop there.  As the days, and weeks, and months of our busy lives go by, we face choices about health all the time.

Will we ride the bike, or drive the car?  Will we run back in and grab those sunglasses before heading out for the day?  How about the sunscreen?  Will it be a night out with friends, or a stop by the gym on the way home?  Will we squeeze in one more episode of NCIS reruns, or will we use that hour toward a good night's sleep?

Duct Tape - It's Not Just For Repairing Broken Tail Lights

If you happen to attend a birthday party for a 'tween girl, don't be surprised if she receives a roll or two of duct tape as a gift.

Not the shiny, silver kind, but brightly colored or patterned with.paisley, leopard print, penguins, polka dots, plaid, skulls, camouflage, cupcakes, bacon and Hello Kitty. Inexpensive and easy to work with, crafters use it to fashion items such as wallets, tote bags, dresses, belts, flowers, book covers and phone cases.

ARBOR DAY TAKES ROOT

Look out any window, and you'll probably see a tree or two - each and every one of them planted by someone, since Denver is a high plains desert region and by definition has no native trees.

The Nebraska Territory was also treeless when pioneer J. Sterling Morton and his bride, Caroline, arrived there in 1854 from Detroit and staked a claim in Nebraska City. He became the editor of the town's newspaper and built a 52-room mansion based on the design of the White House.

We Want to Help YOU (find a job)!!!

Did you know that one of Denver Public Library's Strategic Initiatives is job search assistance? "People's lives are improved by acquiring the resources and skills needed to prosper and contribute to Denver's economy." No doubt this is a goal worth pursuing, but let's talk about what this means, and what steps are being taken to be sure we are doing the best that we can to help our customers.

As part of this initiative, a decision was made to "beef up" the job-related materials in our collection. Over a thousand books, eBooks, audiobooks and DVDs were purchased to enhance career materials already in the collection. These cover a wide-range of topics from entering the job market, to starting a home-based business, to re-entering the job market, or just information about a variety of careers for people wondering what they might want to do. Here's just a sampling of recently purchased items that might be of interest:

April Means Pilgrimage

Canterbury Tales, 1929-31 edition with illustrations by Eric Gill.

April means so many things -- taxes, springtime, poetry, baseball and, naturally, a pilgrimage to Canterbury.

Come again on that last bit? Pilgrimage? Well, yes, if you were a medieval person with a) a guilty conscience, b) the means to travel, and c) the ability to leave family and work for months at a time, you might view April as prime time to hit the road and get thyself to the nearest holy site for redemption. Given the general lawlessness of 14th century England, it would be preferable to find a group of well-armed, like-minded souls heading in your direction. Along the way, you might share your history and tell a few stories to pass the time.

I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write (You) a Letter

Courtesy of donovanbeeson / Flickr / Creative Commons licensed

"Sir, more than kisses, letters mingle souls; for, thus friends absent speak." -- John Donne, in a verse letter to Sir Henry Wotton, written before April 1598.

I love the thrill of finding a hand-written note tucked into the interminable piles of junk mail that show up in my mailbox.

To prove it, I have 25 years of archived correspondence: postcards from around the globe, hand-made birthday cards filled with my sister's effusive love, even a tender billet-doux or two. These physical artifacts tie me emotionally and metaphysically to the people who have touched my life. April is National Card and Letter Writing Month, which gives us the perfect excuse to connect to those we care about through the written word.

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