Books Blog

Do You Read Cli Fi?

Solar

Did you hear this NPR story on what they call an emerging new genre in fiction---Cli Fi, or fiction around issues of climate change?

Meeting at some point between science fiction, apocalyptic fiction, thriller, and contemporary fiction, these books take some of today's predictions and warnings about climate change and extrapolate. With Earth Day and the weather on many people's minds these days, it might be time to try one of these reads. They range from thought-provoking to thrilling!

The Odds Against Tomorrow, Nathaniel Rich

EAARTH DAY (WEEK, MONTH, YEAR)!

Eaarth by Bill McKibben

No, the extra "a" is not a typo. "Eaarth" refers to planet earth as our atmosphere heats up and changes due to a buildup of greenhouse gases (CO2). These gases are a byproduct of burning fossil fuels (gas, oil, and coal) and their effect on our planet are soberly laid out in Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet (2010).

Eaarth may be three years old but its message and forecasts sound like tornado warning sirens. By presenting myriad evidence of climate changes already underway McKibben describes the consequences of our 150+ year history of burning fossil fuels. Last year in Colorado we experienced the Waldo Canyon Fire on the edge of Colorado Springs, the High Park Fire outside of Ft. Collins, and severe drought conditions throughout much of the state. 2012 was the hottest year on the planet in human history!

The Beauty of Short Works

In Persuasion Nation by George Saunders

I naively used to think that writers of short stories and essays simply didn't have enough good material to fill a traditional book. Fortunately some great teachers, and exposure to some of the best writers in the field, showed me the incredible art of short form writing.

The beauty of short works has become even more apparent as I've read too many books lately where I'm left feeling like a shorter essay or short story would've been more powerful. Often (like my college papers) they had a few great things to say but had used filler to make it fit a length requirement. As print magazines, the previous bastion of short form, are shutting their doors, I'm encouraged to see new outlets such as Kindle Singles and Ted Talks remind people that brevity can be a virtue.

Author and Holocaust Survivor, Jack Adler, Speaks at DPL

Born in Pabianice, Poland in 1929, Jack Adler and his family were swept into the terror of the Nazi concentration camps. His parents and four siblings all perished at the hands of the Nazis. In his powerful and inspiring firsthand account, Y: A Holocaust Narrative, Jack (Yacob) tells his story and describes his struggle to survive, overcome and regain a sense of joy about being alive.

Going On: A Lone Survivor’s Story
Sunday, April 21, 3-4:30 p.m.
Central Library, Level B2 Conference Center
Please RSVP

Hugo Award Nominees

Saga

The Hugo Awards, presented annually since 1955, are among science fiction's most prestigious awards for books, short stories, graphic format books, movies, and television.

The winners won't be announced until September, so you have plenty of time to get caught up on some of the year's best science fiction! The nominees are:

Best Novel

Changing the World - One $25 Loan at a Time

The International Bank of Bob cover

The International Bank of Bob is the inspiring memoir of an ordinary American who turned his brief brush with opulence into a joyful adventure of investing in the world's working poor (from the jacket).

Bob Harris, hired by ForbesTraveler.com to review some of the most luxurious accommodations on Earth, was inspired by a chance encounter in Dubai with the impoverished workers whose backbreaking jobs create such opulence. He writes, "My Forbes Traveler cash would be about $20,000... I needed to do something good with it." He then started a list of what he hoped he could do with the money.

Help poverty in 3rd world (at least a little)

Help build an economy, not fix emergencies. Long-term, not short

Know what happened to $ - what it did where

Do You Have a Poem in Your Pocket?

Poem in Your Pocket display

April is National Poetry Month, and April 18 is Poem in Your Pocket Day!

What does that mean? Celebrate poetry by carrying a favorite poem with you all day and sharing it with family, friends, and coworkers! Need ideas for poems to share? There are a few places you can go for inspiration:

Poets.org has a web page dedicated to Poem in Your Pocket Day. There are poems on the site that you can download and print for your pockets, along with other great resources about poets and poetry!

Scribes, Scholars & Storytellers Series Continues into April

Featuring Rev. James Peters and Dominique Ashaheed

The Scribes, Scholars & Storytellers series is in full swing....our next featured authors for April include:

Denver Public School K-8 2D Art Exhibition

Art

This year’s Denver Public School K-8 2D Art Exhibition will be on Level 5 in the Western History Gallery from April 5 through April 25. Come to the library and check out the wonderfully creative drawings, paintings and more.

While you’re here you might get inspiration for your own art project or something to try with your children.

For more inspiration check out these books about art and artists:

Picture Books:

Andrew Drew and Drew by Barney Satlzberg

Art by Patrick McDonnell

Aspiring Artist by Jane O'Connor

LEGO® Building Contest Winners

The Lightning Thief

The DPL system wide LEGO contest has come to an end with four fantastic winners selected. Each of the participating locations selected branch winners, whom all met at the Central Library for the final judging and some LEGO themed fun.

We played LEGO bingo, skee-ball and decorated bookmarks with LEGO bricks!
Thanks to all that participated! And thanks to The Tattered Cover, Chipotle, Jolyon Yates and the Colorado Mills LEGO Store for providing our prizes.
Check out the books that the winning entries were based on:

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