Books Blog

Celebrate Women's Fiction

Alif the Unseen

Celebrate Women's History Month by reading some of the outstanding fiction by female authors on the recently announced Women's Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize) long list.

Now in its 18th year, the U.K. prize celebrates fiction written in English by women. The long list finalists are from various countries, including the U.K., Israel, Canada, the United States, New Zealand, Turkey, and Australia. Check out one of these great titles today, and look for the short list announcement in April and the winner in June!

A Trick I Learned from Dead Men, Kitty Aldridge

Alif the Unseen, G. Willow Wilson

In Case Of Emergency, Eat This Book

I recently received Dr. Kessler's book, The End Of Overeating, in the mail. It was from my friend Mary, and included a sweet, heartfelt note that read, "In the event of an emergency, eat this book." Ahh, friends. So far, it's delicious.

Truthfully, Mary and I are both fighting a battle of the bulge. She is my cheerleader and I am hers. Last year, when Dr. Joel Fuhrman visited The Denver Public Library, I had the doctor sign a copy of his book Eat To Live for Mary and I mailed it to her for inspiration. 

Lambda Literary Award Finalists Announced

Theft

The finalists for the 25th annual Lambda Literary Awards were recently announced. The Lammys celebrate GLBT literature and are given in many categories, including fiction, romance, biography/memoir, children's/young adult, and sf/fantasy/horror.

If you want your next read to have GLBT themse, this is a great list to start with! For the complete list of finalists, see the Lambda Literary Foundation web site. The site also lists past winners and nominees. 

Holocaust and Hope: Students Speak

Currently gracing the main display at the Central Library, these accordion books created by 7th and 8th graders at the Challenge School in Denver showcase the power of words combined with poignant imagery.

Holocaust Remembrance Art Exhibit
Friday, March 1 through Thursday, March 28
Central Library, Level 1 Schlessman Hall

How do today’s middle-schoolers relate to the World Wars and the Holocaust? What can others learn from their reflections?

Scribes, Scholars & Storytellers Series 2013

Featuring Adrian Miller and JD Mason

The Blair-Caldwell Library created the Scribes, Scholars and Storytellers series to assist and uplift members of the Denver African American community that are involved in or trying to break into the published field. We strive to offer material from a wide range of genres. This year we have an awesome variety of talent. 13 Denver based scholars, poets and authors who will be sharing their creativity starting March 11 and ending on May 22. Join us for an exciting series, promising a little something for everyone!

James Tiptree, Jr. Awards Announced

The Drowning Girl

The James Tiptree, Jr. Award and honor books were recently announced.

What is the Tiptree? Given since 1991, it is "an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender...The aim of the award is not to look for work that falls into some narrow definition of political correctness, but rather to seek out work that is thought-provoking, imaginative, and perhaps even infuriating." The Tiptree is named after Alice B. Sheldon, who used the pen name James Tiptree, Jr. to publish her science fiction and fantasy stories, genres largely closed to women at the time she was writing.

Teen Book Club at Central Starts March 23

Teens, you've been asking for a book club at Central forever! We can finally start one!

We are going to meet on Saturday, 23 March at 10 AM to talk about what kind of book club you would like and also to pick out some books to read. We will have donuts! Awesome!

Some of you have suggested that we have a sci-fi and fantasy book club-- this can happen if you want it to. Or, we can read a bit of everything. So swing by the library with a list of books you think we should read! Bring a friend so you know that at least 2 cool people will be there. Also, we should probably have a cool name, right? So think about that too.

Cold, Colder, Coldest

Antarctica

During the colder months, some folks like to read about tropical climates and warm days. I have a tendency to want to read about places that are even colder than where I am.

Enter my obsession over books about Antarctica. I don't know that I'll ever get to visit there, but I do love to read about it, both in fiction and nonfiction. While there is a vast body of literature about Antarctic explorers such as Amundsen, Shackleton, and Scott, my reading about the cold continent tends to be about modern folks--scientists and other curious types--who have recorded their time there and are often studying the (few) animals that live there, along with other studies including climate change, the earth's history, and even the possibilities of life on Mars.

Author Event: One Land, Two Stories

One Land Two Stories

Join Fresh City Life My Branch in partnership with The Colorado Ballet's Light Project for a presentation by the authors of One Land Two Stories.

The presentation will be Sunday, March 3 at 2 p.m. at Schlessman.

Shaul Gabbay was born and raised in Tel Aviv. The son of Jewish Arab refugees, he was educated in Israel, received his Ph.D. from Columbia University, and completed his postdoctoral studies at the University of Chicago. Born in Haifa, Amin Kazak became a Palestinian refugee in 1948. Kazak completed advanced degrees from the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, and earned a Ph.D. from the University of Denver.

Dear Marcus: A letter to the Man who Shot Me

Author and teacher, Jerry McGill, presents an intimate memoir which discusses the events that led to his becoming a quadriplegic.

His life, like several others, Christopher Reeve and Joni Eareckson Tada, took a different road when circumstances changed the course of their lives forever.

On New Years Eve of 1981, thirteen year old McGill was walking home with a friend, when he was struck by the bullet of an unknown assailant, leaving him a quadriplegic for life. This memoir is a personal letter to his unknown assailant, who McGill calls Marcus.

The data surrounding violence and youth is alarming.

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