Books Blog

Recent Reads on Differences

As a person with a disability, I am always interested in new books about others who live with differences.

I have read three books lately. In The Anti-Romantic Child, Priscilla Gilman who is an expert on the poet, Wadsworth, intertwines his poetry as she describes her journey as a mother of a son with special needs. Elizabeth Bonker is an adolescent who has autism and writes poetry, though she is unable to speak. I Am in Here describes her life and how her parents have helped her.

'MetaMaus' Celebrates 25 Years of Maus

Twenty five years ago, Art Spiegelman gave us Maus, a story about enduring and surviving the Holocaust and the father/son relationship that developed afterward. The only graphic novel to have been awarded a Pulitzer Prize, it is now iconic, and has influenced how many of us think about comics, narrative and fiction, and literature.

And now, to celebrate and commemorate this groundbreaking work, Spiegelman has given us MetaMaus, a behind-the-scenes explanation and exploration of the work.

If you are interested in more graphic novels of the non-superhero, and non “funny papers” variety, here are a few places to start.

NPR's Back-Seat Book Club for ages 9-14

The Graveyard Book

National Public Radio (NPR) has started a special project for listeners ages 9-14: the Back-Seat Book Club. Beginning in October, the show All Things Considered would like young listeners and their parents to read a selected book each month and then join in the conversation with that book's author. They want to know what you think and give the author a chance to answer questions you have about the book!

The first selection in the Back-Seat Book Club is The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, which is perfect for Halloween. It's the story of Nobody Owens, a boy who is normal in every way – except that he has been raised by ghosts in a graveyard.

Fire: A Spy Thriller

Cover of Fire: A Spy Graphic Novel

Looking for suspense and intrigue? Check out a spy thriller where nothing is as it appears to be and trust is not an option.

Life imitates art for Brian Michael Bendis who gathered inspiration for his graphic novel from the American intelligence community. While a fan of traditional spy novels, I enjoyed how the graphic art moved the narrative along, increasing the drama! Fire is a quick read revealing the anxious, paranoid existence of a spy's life.

Bendis also encourages his readers to check out the following titles:

A Man With No Talents

A Man with No Talents: Memoirs of a Tokyo Day Laborer

Talk About Bleak

Oskar here, again, to share another InterLibrary Loan gem -- A Man with No Talents: Memoirs of a Tokyo Day Laborer. Maybe "gem" is a little strong because this book gave me some trouble with its extremely introverted and destitute characters, most of whom lead a zombie-like, meandering existence. So how about "find" or, better yet, "warning"?

Authors, Authors, Everywhere!

The  Way of the Happy Woman

If you want to meet an author this weekend, you have numerous opportunities!

On Saturday, October 22 at 2:00 p.m. at the Ross-Cherry Creek Branch join Sara Avant Stover as she discusses

National Novel Writing Month (NANOWRIMO)

nanowrimo

Prepare now - November is National Novel Writing Month. If you've always longed to write, now is the time to read up and glue yourself to a chair.

Many of us have a longing to write. Very few of us ever manage to realize the dream of the writer's life. This is the year, things could change for all of us. November is National Novel Writing Month. Register at this site and receive all of the support you'll need to get started.

While we're waiting for NANOWRIMO to begin, here are a few resources you might find helpful. Oh - and if you feel like tackling your writing project now, by all means, scribble away!

A snail, really? Yes!

snail eating

The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, really is about a wild snail eating. But it goes further and deeper than that - Bailey takes us on a literal and researched journey deep into the silence, patience and awed perception of a wild snail eating from her bedside as she recovers from her own illness.

This book was relatable and comforting for me as it explored the different levels of illness. Although a sometimes sad and difficult topic, this story's outlook became a mirror for my life and could for many other people who have experienced the emotional and mental obstacles of overcoming illness.

New Cozy Mysteries

Cookie Dough or Die

Murder can ruin a perfectly good day. The sleuths in these new mystery titles are determined to get on with their lives even if it means solving a crime at the most inopportune time!

The "detectives" in cozy mysteries aren't usually CSI experts but rather everyday people who happen to stumble across dead bodies or have friends who need help. 

Many sleuths become resident experts in their often small communities. And like a really good cookie, one cozy mystery is never enough.

Here are a few, first titles in new mystery series available at the Library:

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention - Captures the hearts of critics

Manning Marable, the noted History professor at Columbia University and the Founding Director of IRAAS (Institute for Research in African American Studies) at Columbia University, opens the platform for dialogue concerning the life of Malcolm X and his membership in the Nation of Islam.

Recently I read Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, a book written by the late Manning Marable, who unfortunately died days before the book was released.

 

Syndicate content