Books Blog

Why You Should Read Louise Erdrich

A great book for book clubs and one you shouldn't miss.

Since college (so many years ago), I have always been a fan of Louise Erdrich, but until the publication of her most recent book, The Round House, I had let a few of her books slip by without reading them. When my book club selected The Round House, I felt this was the perfect opportunity to get caught up. Wow! While most of Erdrich's books are complicated and require dedication and focus to plow through, The Round House, is completely accessible to your average reader.

Pop Microhistories: Great Big Stories about Extremely Specific Subjects

Tubes

Good news for popular nonfiction readers: we've recently published a new online booklist chock-full of microhistories. So what is a microhistory, anyway?

The term has meant different things to different people over the years. First used by historians to describe close investigations into the lives of common people, early examples of the practice include Carlo Ginzburg's The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller and Natalie Zemon Davis's The Return of Martin Guerre.

Did You Miss This?

The Delta Sisters

If you browse the book stacks at the Central Library, chances are you'll spy a "Did you miss this?" bookmark tucked in a title. Staff periodically flag a book that may have fallen off your reading radar. Who knows? You may discover a new, favorite title!

Come, My Little Angel by Diane Nobel
A slim novella tells the story of 10 year old Daisy who is praying for a miracle in the High Sierras. If you like the series, Chicken Soup for the Soul, this story may be for you!

Current Resources on Individuals with Autism

Currently there is much being written about individuals who live with autism. Denver Public Library has many resources. In Colorado there are many organizations ready and able to assist.

Adult Nonfiction Books

It's That Time of Year... Part Emily

Written in Red by Anne Bishop

Our intrepid buyer and blogger Becker threw down the gauntlet and I will pick it up. Here is my list of books that best pleased me in the year 2013.

While Becker organized her blog into genres here's a simple list of my favorite reads. According to Goodreads I read 165 books this year so these are simply the ones that rose to the top!

Holiday Gift Guide: Books for Kids & Teens

That Is NOT a Good Idea!

The holidays are almost upon us, and here at Denver Public Library the Children's Librarians have been hard at work, gathering the very best books published in 2013 to help you give the gift of reading to the children and teens in your life. 

Books for the Very Youngest

Alphablock by Christopher Franceschelli, illustrated by Peskimo.  Alphablock is a lift-the-letter-as-the-flap book with the die-cut letter on top and the pictorial representation underneath. This beautiful book will be read again and again.

It's That Time of the Year...

If You Could Be Mine

Yes, everyone from The New York Times to NPR is coming out with their take on "the best books of 2013" right now.

I won't promise this list is "the best," but they're all books I enjoyed this year for various reasons. Please add your own favorite 2013 reads in the comments!! I hope some of my fabulous DPL colleagues will post their own lists, too--we're a diverse group with varying interests and tastes in books.

Science Fiction & Horror:

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King--Classic King. Well-drawn characters, good vs. evil, creepy villains. And a Colorado conection!

Autodidacts Walk Among Us

Hat with "Autodidact University"

Unlike zombies, autodidacts or the self-educated, are difficult to spot. You won't recognize a road scholar (as opposed to Rhodes Scholar) unless you talk to them, especially if you hit on a subject of interest. The clerk at your local 7-11, the man standing in front of you at the bus stop, or the teen carrying groceries - all could be amateur scholars.

Life experience, observation, and study are primary tools for autodidacts. And the Library is the epicenter of many of their lives. Ray Bradbury, a noted autodidact, shared his experience: “Libraries raised me…I graduated from high school, it was during the Depression and we had no money. I couldn’t go to college, so I went to the library three days a week for 10 years.” Even if money or privilege isn't an issue, these passionate learners determine the establishment can't give them what they need.

Reading to Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Children

Image: woman and child reading, ASL (Gallaudet University image)

Reading to deaf and hard-of-hearing children is just as important as reading to hearing children; in fact, the same things are important: creating a literacy-rich environment, building vocabulary, engaging children's brains, building confidence and more. There are, however, some different considerations. The Belmar Library (Jefferson County Libraries) will host a workshop called:

Gateway to Reading: Book Sharing with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children based on effective book sharing techniques as outlined in The 15 Principles of Reading to Deaf Children. The workshop will be held on Thursday, December 5 from 5 - 7:30 p.m. Registration is required.
Please email Deborah.Dauenheimer@jeffcolibrary.org no later than Friday, November 29.

 

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