Reviews and Blog Posts: art

Let me off at the top! : my classy life & other musings

by Ron Burgundy

Reviewer Rating:
5

Great Odin’s raven! This is the classiest book at the Library, hands-down. I mean, it’s classy. Though at times it got difficult to read because there were so many words…it’s the kind of book that you can pretend to read and still look good doing it.

The lump of coal

by Lemony Snicket

Reviewer Rating:
3

The Lump of Coal by Lemony Snicket is about the adventures of a little lump of coal, in a little tux, who dreams of becoming an artist despite what all the naysayers and phonies say on his quest. Soon he  becomes discouraged and settles for something that is better than...

Ladies and Gentlemen, let me introduce to you- Jan Švankmajer!

His name is Jan Švankmajer and he is probably hands down the most creative, disturbing, artistic movie director who has ever lived!

My statement above is no joke; I swear, even the master of darkness (Stephen King) cannot compete with Jan Švankmajer. Seriously-- take a look at one of his films! I swear, they appear to be from another planet.  Even though it might seem that Jan Švankmajer is seriously loony!!! I must say he is a creative genius!!!!

The girl you left behind

by Jojo Moyes

Reviewer Rating:
3

I both liked and didn't like The Girl You Left Behind. I enjoyed the book's two settings: 1916 and present day. I learned a lot about German-occupied France during World War I. I also liked the main male character during the present-day setting. However, I had a hard time feeling...

PostSecret : extraordinary confessions from ordinary lives

by Frank (Frank C.) Warren

Reviewer Rating:
4

Frank Warren invited people to send him secrets anonymously on postcards as part of a community art project.  Some are fantastically artistic.  Some are insightful.  Some are heartbreaking.  Some are deep.  Some are dark.  Some are very dark.  All are fascinating... 

Paint like a Master

Painting the Great Masters by Number

I'll admit I have very little actual artistic talent, but with some books from the library and some patience I might just be able to fool you!

I found the following gems in the stacks one day and got truly inspired!

Paint by Number by William Bird

Painting the Great Masters by Number: Create Your Own Masterpiece with this Easy Paint-By-Number Program by Ivan Hissey with Curtis Tappenden

Painting Masterpieces Consultant Editor, Mark Churchill

 

The house girl : a novel

by Tara Conklin

Reviewer Rating:
5

The House Girl is a masterful debut novel, weaving the lives of Lina Sparrow, a present-day attorney and Josephine, a seventeen-year-old house slave in an unforgettable tapestry. As Lina researches documents to uncover a "face" for a class-action lawsuit to which she's been assigned, she begins to uncover questions and...

Catching the big fish : meditation, consciousness, and creativity

by David Lynch

Reviewer Rating:
5

You don't need to "get" David Lynch to be wowed by this book. He describes the process of trolling the waters of consciousness via meditation to catch the big idea. I picture Lynch, however, surfing an undulating wave and art happens when he rides the crest. Either way, discipline is...

Zine much?

book cover for Whatcha Mean What is a Zine?

July is National Zine Month and the ideal time to make a zine (pronounced "zeen"). Hand-made and about anything you can imagine, zines allow you an uncensored voice. Yes, you control all aspects of the content, design and distribution.

Creating a basic zine is easy! Start with your idea, paper, a writing/drawing tool, and create. Once you have what you want to say down on paper, head over to a photocopier. My favorite how-to zine book, Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine?, steps you through the zine process from "Should I staple?" to "Where do I leave my zine for others to enjoy?"

Little Free Libraries: Neighbors Creating Richer Communities

Our Little Free Library by Robin Filipczak

This spring, my family installed a Little Free Library in front of our home. Have you heard about these libraries? Founded in 2009, the Little Free Library movement seeks to:

promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide

build a sense of community as people share skills, creativity and wisdom across generations.

Owners can create their own library box or purchase one from Little Free Library and register on the organization's website. Library locations are then geolocated on a Google Map.

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