Reviews and Blog Posts: film

Be Mine, blah, blah, blah: Anti-Valentine's Day Party at DPL

If the treacle-y sweetness of Valentine's Day leaves you feeling not so loving, come sit next to us for a night of ironic, cinema fun. We're throwing our annual Anti-Valentine's Day Party and you're invited!

Anti-Valentine’s Day Party: He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not
Tuesday, February 11, 6:30-9 p.m.
Central Library, Level B2 Conference Center

If You Can't Stand The Heat, Go To the Movies: Special Saturday Film Presentation of Wall-E

Denver Public Library is the coolest place to be on a hot summer day. We're turning down the lights and serving up a film treat for the whole family. Join us for a large screen presentation of Pixar's modern fairytale, Wall-E. 

With beautiful animation and grown-up themes of consumerism, mass consumption and unrequited love, WALL-E is entertaining for the most discerning film enthusiast while at the same time capturing the imagination of kids. It's a visual delight.

This film is being shown in conjunction with our morning cooking demo series United State of Food, which centers on food supply education. Come to both events or just cruise in for the movie.

Film On The Side: Denver Public Library hosts an outdoor showing of the new classic UP

Join Fresh City Life for our first ever outdoor film presentation. We'll have some chairs waiting for you, but you can bring a favorite blanket or pillow to sit on. Bring the whole family, too; Up is a great film for all ages.

We'll have some iced beverages and snacks for you -- so bring a little walking around money. Then kick back and enjoy the novelty of a film presented on the side of your Central Library. Free and open to the public.

Up (2009)
Friday, July 12,8:30-10:30 p.m.
Central Library, Acoma Plaza

Funny Business: Documentary Film Series

Not since Garbo laughed in the film, Ninotchka, has so much been done by one American to make a Russian laugh -- according to the documentary film, Exporting Raymond. Denver Public Library Film Series kicks off its 8th annual documentary showcase this Tuesday.

Denver Public Library’s Film Series has put together a mini-collection of docs that explores the world of comedy entertainment. Documentary films are often funny accidentally. These are no exception – but they also chronicle the world of professional comedy and comedy writing. It’s serious fun to watch other people try to be funny, with varying levels of success!

Oscar Wilde's Salome: Cinema's First Art Film Plays at DPL

The film Salomé starring Russian-born American actress and producer Alla Nazimova is legendary -- for its cast (rumored to be all gay and lesbian), its delayed release (made in 1923, it wasn't viewed by American Audiences until 1937), its complete failure to capture a contemporary audience and its current reappraisal as one of the foremost art films in cinema history with a devoted fan base. Enjoy a rare screening of Salomé on our big screen!

Fresh City Life's first film series of the new year, Vamp: Femme Fatales of the Silent Era, wraps with an exquisite relic from the silver screen archives. It's a treasure!

Salomé (1923)
Tuesday, March 19, 6:30-9 p.m.
Central Library, Level B2 Conference Center

Our Dancing Daughters: Hollywood's Zenith of the Jazz Era

Joan Crawford in Our Dancing Daughters. Photo: Glamamor.com

A film considered the great apex of the silent film era, Our Dancing Daughters is a perfect time capsule of 1920s high society and a showcase for the young woman formerly known as Lucille Le Sueur -- Joan Crawford.

She rose to fame as the quintessential Jazz Baby -- a woman of social means and relaxed morals who was liberated of the corsets and sexual mores of the previous age. And Joan Crawford was embraced by American and international film fans as the ideal movie star. She remained a box office favorite until the late 1940s and never stopped being a star until her death in 1977.

She Was The First "It" Girl

"We had individuality. We did as we pleased. We stayed up late. We dressed the way we wanted. I used to whiz down Sunset Boulevard in my open Kissel, with several red chow dogs to match my hair. Today, they're sensible and end up with better health. But we had more fun." -- Clara Bow

She challenged even the relaxed mores of Hollywood. Born to a mentally ill mother who tainted much of her childhood, she came from poverty and abuse to remake herself into the eponymous IT girl; Clara Bow is the stuff of Hollywood legends.

See the original film this month at Denver Public Library, and you'll get "it."

The Perfect Valentine's Day = Chocolate, Roses and Zombies

If all the hearts and flowers and sugary confections leave you feeling a bit underwhelmed, Fresh City Life offers an alternative: our Anti-Valentine’s Day Heartburn Party. And this year, for fun, we've added in zombies.

When we talked to our friends at Mile High Cinema and told them that we wanted to do something extra special for our Anti-Valentine's Day party this year, they didn't hesitate when they told us they had the perfect film for us: a new entry in the current love affair with zombies, Pontypool. Hope you can join us for this presentation of a newly-minted classic.

Shirley MacLaine and Anne Bancroft go toe-to-toe in The Turning Point

The famous fight scene

Revisit this 1970s gem that holds the Academy Awards record for the most nominated film that didn't win a single Oscar.

Knitting en Pointe: Movie and Knitting Workshop hosted by the Colorado Ballet.

The Turning Point (1977)
Thursday, January 31, 7:15-10:15 p.m.
Colorado Ballet Academy, 1278 Lincoln Street, Denver, 80203

VAMPIRES: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BLOODSUCKING UNDEAD

From Bela Lugosi's courtly, cornball, heavily accented count to the angst-ridden teen leeches of the Twilight series, vampires have been an essential part of film history. Our fascination with them, experts suggest, has something to do with our fear of death and yearning for immortality at any price -- or maybe it's just cool to imagine an eternity of partying all night and sleeping all day.

Some version of the vampire myth has existed in nearly every culture; the first recorded account came from Western Europe during the Middle Ages. Since there was no explanation for disease or natural disasters, vampires were blamed. They were depicted as foul, bloated, and barely semi-human. It wasn't until John Polidori's 1819 novella The Vampyre that they began their transformation into the charismatic and nicely dressed entities that we know and love today.

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